Q. What is a "Home Inspection"?

A home inspection is an objective visual examination of the physical structure and systems of a home, from the roof to the foundation. A large number of specialized tools are employed to give accurate measurements. The standard home inspector's report will include an evaluation of the condition of the home's heating system, central air conditioning system (temperature permitting), interior plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic, and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation, basement, and visible structure.

Having a home inspected is like giving it a "medical" physical checkup. If problems or symptoms are found, I will refer you to the appropriate specialist or tradesperson for further evaluation. A good inspector will not recommend any particular  person or company, thus avoiding any conflict of interest or alliance.

Q. When is the report delivered?

n1. The report is delivered wnithin 24 hours of the inspection completion via email or fax.n

n2.The paper report complete with digital photos is mailed via the postal system via PRIORIETY Mail.

n* Special deliveries can be arranged at an additional charge. Please don't ask for special services unless you are willing to pay extra.

Q. Why do I need a home inspection?

The purchase of a home is probably the largest single investment you will ever make. You should learn as much as you can about the condition of the property and the need for any major repairs before you buy, so that you can minimize unpleasant surprises and difficulties afterwards.

Of course, a home inspection will also point out the positive aspects of a home, as well as the maintenance that will be necessary to keep it in good shape. After the inspection, you will have a much clearer understanding of the property you are about to purchase, and will be able to make a confident buying decision.

If you have owned your home for a long time, a home inspection can identify problems in the making and recommend preventive measures which might avoid costly future repairs. In addition, home sellers may opt for having an inspection prior to placing the home on the market to gain a better understanding of conditions which the buyer's inspector may point out. This provides an opportunity to make repairs that will put the house in better selling condition.

Q. Why do I need a home inspection?

The purchase of a home is probably the largest single investment you will ever make. You should learn as much as you can about the condition of the property and the need for any major repairs before you buy, so that you can minimize unpleasant surprises and difficulties afterwards.

Of course, a home inspection will also point out the positive aspects of a home, as well as the maintenance that will be necessary to keep it in good shape. After the inspection, you will have a much clearer understanding of the property you are about to purchase, and will be able to make a confident buying decision.

If you have owned your home for a long time, a home inspection can identify problems in the making and recommend preventive measures which might avoid costly future repairs. In addition, home sellers may opt for having an inspection prior to placing the home on the market to gain a better understanding of conditions which the buyer's inspector may point out. This provides an opportunity to make repairs that will put the house in better selling condition.

Q. When is the best time to have the inspection for a used home?

The answer varies on who you are in the transaction.

If you are buying a used home: Ideally you should have the property inspected before you make an offer to purchase. Often buyers wait until after the offer is accepted to have the property inspected. The real estate agent may insist to you to have an offer on the table even before suggesting to the home owner that an inspector be allowed accesses to the property. 

Commonly you may have the house inspected immediately after signed contract for an offer is returned to you. Usually there is a tiny 10 day period for the inspection and a few days to get estimates on repairs and replacement equipment. Few buyers are prepared for the time crunch that they will be going through. The agents want to give the buyer as little time as possible to deal with the laborious process of dealing with details. 

Q. When is the best time to have the inspection for a new home? 

For new construction, the inspections ideally are to take place over a number of weeks. Timing is critical and the status of the property changes daily while under construction. The smart home buyer of a new property has at least three inspections at different times during the construction phase. Seven or more inspections will help keep the builder closer to the building standards and hopefully aware that the buyer has an eye on their work. Some builders never want to have their work checked thus try to hide flaws or hinder the inspection process. Eventually l add more details here to help consumers in the real estate purchasing maze.

Q. When is the best time to have the inspection for a home sold at auction? 

As far as foreclosures,  and HUD properties sold at auction are concerned. It is best to have the property inspected before you make a bid on the property. Many of the foreclosed properties are in a horrid state of disrepair and may require extensive rework. Although some may be a real bargain, others are problematic money pits. If accesses to the property before the auction is prohibitive, the buyer should be aware of potential trouble areas. 

Rental properties are usually in poor condition. Condo and town homes that once were rental apartments also are usually in very poor shape. They should be inspected before you make an offer to purchase.

Q. What will it cost?

The inspection fee for a typical one family house varies geographically, as does the cost of housing. Similarly, within a given area, the inspection fee may vary depending upon the size of the house, particular features of the house, its age, and possible additional services, such as septic , water well, or lawn sprinklers. 

However, do not let cost be a factor in deciding whether or not to have a home inspection, or in the selection of your home inspector. The knowledge gained from an inspection is well worth the cost, and the lowest priced inspector is not necessarily a bargain. The inspector's qualifications, including his experience, training, and professional affiliations, should be the most important consideration. Large homes can easily have a charge of $500.00 and a very small home  could be as little as $250. I don't inspect trailers. 

Q. Can't I do it myself?

Yes, you can and if your feel comfortable with the task I will suggest some books to read first. You probably won't have time within the option period to obtain, read and understand all the material. However even the most experienced home owner lacks the knowledge and expertise of a professional home inspector who has inspected hundreds, perhaps thousands, of homes in his or her career. An inspector is familiar with all the elements of home construction, their proper installation, and maintenance. He or she understands how the home's systems and components are intended to function together, as well as how and why they fail.

Above all, most buyers find it very difficult to remain completely objective and unemotional about the house they really want, and this may affect their judgment. For the most accurate picture, it is best to obtain an impartial third party opinion by an expert in the field of home inspection.

Q. When do I call in the home inspector?

A home inspector is typically called right after the contract or purchase agreement has been signed, and is often available within a few days. However, before you sign, be sure that there is an inspection clause in the contract, making your purchase obligation contingent upon the findings of a professional home inspection. This clause should specify the terms to which both the buyer and seller are obligated. Normally this is in section seven (property conditions) of the standard "One to Four Family Residential Contract" as written by the Texas Real Estate Commission.

Q. Can a house fail inspection?

Not exactly. A professional home inspection is an examination of the current condition of your prospective home. It is not an appraisal, which determines market value, or a municipal inspection, which verities local code compliance for new construction. Most houses, even those under construction now, do NOT meet current building codes. This is especially true of houses built in an unincorporated area. A home inspector, therefore, will not pass or fail a house, but rather describe its physical condition and indicate what may need repair or replacement.

Q. How do I find a home inspector?

A good source is a friend, or perhaps a business acquaintance, who has been satisfied with, and can recommend, a home inspector they have used. 

Real estate agents are also generally familiar with the service, and should be able to provide you with a list of names from which to choose. Getting referrals from a real estate agent is a double edged sword. The agent may are may not be committed to the inspection process because they FEAR having a deal KILLED by an accurate yet "unfavorable" report. The worst real estate agents color their recommendations thus the list might reflect their point of view. 

Whatever your referral source, be sure to ascertain the home inspector's professional qualifications, experience, and business ethics before you make your selection. You can do this by checking with the Texas Real Estate Commission and asking if a particular inspector has complaints against them.

Avoid anyone who engages in any conflict of interest activities which might compromise their objectivity, such as using the inspection as a means to obtain home repair contracts.

Who should be at the inspection?

Ideally only the buyer and the inspector. 

Q. Do I have to be there?

Yes, but it's not necessary for you to be present for the entire inspection, but it is recommended if your time allows it. By following the home inspector around the house, by observing and asking questions, you will learn a great deal about the condition of the home, how its systems work, and how to maintain it. You will also find the written report easier to understand if you've seen the property first hand through the inspector's eyes. It is best that real estate agent not remain at the site during the inspection. Your presence as a buyer is necessary to get the verbal account of the findings and to pay for the services. 

Q. What if the report reveals problems?

There WILL be some problems, even in new homes. No house, builder or home owner is perfect. If the inspector finds problems, it doesn't necessarily mean you shouldn't buy the house, only that you will know in advance what to expect. A seller may be flexible with the purchase price or contract terms if major problems are found. If your budget is very tight, or if you don't wish to become involved in future repair work, this information will be extremely important to you. Many problems are caused directly by do it yourselfers who have no idea what the proper procedures are in related to proper building standards. The trade industries too make their mistakes and create many problems when trying to fix another problem. More often than not they cut corners in order to save a few dollars while hoping that the homeowner is unaware of the proper methods. Unfortunately many times the homeowner does not know enough about practices to know what corner were cut by lazy unprofessional repair people. 

Q. What if I find problems after I move into my new home?

A home inspection is not a guarantee that problems won't develop after you move in. However if you believe that a problem was already visible at the time of the inspection and should have been mentioned in the report, your first step should be to call and meet with the inspector to clarify the situation. Misunderstandings are often resolved in this manner.

If necessary, you might wish to consult with a local mediation service to help you settle your disagreement. Though many home inspectors today carry Errors & Omissions liability insurance, litigation should be considered a last resort. It is difficult, expensive, and by no means a sure method of recovery.

Q. If the house proves to be in good condition, did I really need an inspection?

Definitely. Now you can complete your home purchase with peace of mind about the condition of the property and all its equipment and systems. You will also have learned a few things about your new home from the inspector's report, and will want to keep that information for future reference. Above all, you can feel assured that you are making a well informed purchase decision, and that you will be able to enjoy.

Q. How much will it cost?

Inspection fees vary depending on the age & description of the home, its size, whether it has a basement or crawl space, the square footage and the location, plus elected options. For a free quotation, you should telephone and provide a description of the listing information for the home. 

Q. When is payment due?

Payment is due upon completion of the home inspection and before the receipt of the final report. Both a personal check or cash are acceptable. (Note: Credit cards are not honored.)

Q. Is a Home inspection Required?

No, a home inspection is not required for the purchase or sale of real estate. However, future mortgage lending requirements may require a home inspection to document the condition of the property prior to commitment. A home inspection is an impartial second opinion regarding the condition of the property on the day of inspection. The home inspector is generally the ONLY person who is in your corner, representing your interests by using training, experience and observation skills to document the visual problems in the home. A home inspection may not be required, but can you afford not to know the facts before making the biggest purchase of a lifetime?

Q: Why can�t I have someone in my family who is very handy or a contractor, inspect my new home?

This is the biggest mistake many potential new homeowners make when purchasing a home. Although the person you are considering may be very skilled, they are not trained or experienced at professional home inspections. Professional home inspection is a unique skill like no other. Professional inspectors get what we call an inspector�s instinct for problems. That instinct takes extensive training and lots of experience doing inspections to develop. Many contractors, and other trades professionals hire a professional home inspector to inspect their homes when they make a purchase. 

Q: What if I have questions after the inspection?

You can call me and discuss all the aspects of your new home whenever you like. My service is a long-term investment.

Q. What is the scope of the inspection?

The scope of the home inspection is defined by an agreement will reached t the site and prior to the inspection. The contract represents an agreement between you and the inspection company and will describe such things as: terms and conditions, services, standards, exclusions & limitations, exceptions and fee schedule. There are NO EXPRESS WARRANTIES MADE.

The home inspection final report is a summation or an impartial 2nd opinion by a trained professional regarding the visual problems observed on the date of inspection ONLY. To prevent false expectations, the inspector will NOT find every little problem in the home during his visit as it is impossible to view all areas or experience seasonal changes. The inspector is not required to move furniture, move stored goods, enter hazardous, perform destructive testing, dismantling of anything or climb on the roof.

The home inspection will be performed in accordance with the Standards of Practice of the Texas Real Estate Commission.

  • Structural components

  • Exterior

  • Roofing

  • Electrical

  • Plumbing

  • Heating

  • Central Air Conditioning

  • Interiors

  • Insulation and Ventilation

  • NOTICE: Specialty inspections such a PEST INSPECTION, should be contracted separately. 

Q. How do I schedule and inspection?

To schedule an inspection, simply telephone (281)-480-3388 and make your request. If I am away from the office, just leave a message on my answering machine and I will call you back. Appointments are usually available seven days a week and I can usually accommodate your needs with 24-48 hours notice. When you call, you should have all of the listing data describing the home and its address handy for a cost quotation.

Q. What does it include?

The standard home inspector's report will review the condition of the home's heating system, central air conditioning system (temperature permitting), interior plumbing and electrical systems; the roof, attic, and visible insulation; walls, ceilings, floors, windows and doors; the foundation, basement, and visible structure.

Q. What if the report reveals problems ?

Newly constructed houses too have many problems that are hidden to the regular purchaser. If the inspector identifies problems, it doesn't necessarily mean you shouldn't buy the house, only that you will know in advance what to expect. A seller may adjust the purchase price or contract terms if major problems are found. If your budget is tight, or if you don't wish to become involved in future repair work, this information will be extremely important to you.

 Q. What kind of formal INSPECTION training have you had?

 I am licensed by the Texas Real Estate Commission. It is a licensed standing backed by a test and continuing education.

Q. Can you make repairs if they are needed?

 NO! NEVER! If any inspector says "yes"-- BEWARE! They may have a vested interest in the outcome of their report. I don't do repairs and I don't often make repair estimates. I have a strict Code of Ethics which forbids any actions that could be interpreted as a conflict of interest. If you need repair estimates I have industrial information available for that purpose. There is a special charge for such a repair estimate report.

Q. How long does your inspection take?

My standard inspection takes 3 to 5 hours to complete. I strictly adhere to the Standards of Practice outlines. The extra investment of time assures you of not only the highest quality inspection but the same thorough inspection every time.

Q. Do you have a written guarantee that your report is accurate?

 Most home inspectors have disclaimers, or they are simply unaware of the liability they are assuming. I perform a visual inspection and evaluate the condition of the components of the home based upon the simple criteria of durability and serviceability. The standards that I am responsible to report are contained in the Standards of Practice as published by the Texas Real Estate Commission.

Q. What happens if you honestly miss something?

I strive to do my very best, yet realize that I are only human and prone to occasionally making mistakes. Therefore, I stand by my work, and  try to right the wrongs that I may make. I have built the business on performing the highest quality Home Inspections and I have a long list of satisfied buyers, sellers and agents, one of which may have referred you to our service.

Q. Do you go over the report in person with the buyer?

 I prefer to review the property with the buyer at the conclusion of the inspection to show them firsthand anything discovered during the inspection. I have found that this is the key to giving a buyer peace of mind about their property. When the buyer is out of the area, I go through the report with them over the phone page by page.

Q. What kind of report can I expect?

 I have a state-of-the-art computer generated report. I am able to take advantage of technology to create a report that is easy to understand and quite comprehensive. This type of report points out the weaknesses of the home. The strengths of the house are given orally.

 I have created many supporting documents that supplement the property specific reports. They cover a wide spectrum of topics that can help you with detailed areas. These supporting documents are never available to real estate agents or other 3rd parties.

Q. When do I get the report?

 I either hand email, fax or mail a copy of the report within 24 hours. With out of area buyers, I can either fax the report to them or priority mail them a hard copy. Time is of the essence and next-day delivery allows the transaction to go forward.

Q. How much is your fee?

 It has never been my goal to be the cheapest inspector in town--only the most Diligent I have always felt that the buyer deserves the highest value for his investment dollar. I set my fees according to the size, age, location and components of the home. A quality inspection may require a higher investment, but it will save you both money and time by eliminating unnecessary headaches later on down the line.

Q. If the house proves to be in good condition, did I really need an inspection ?

 Definitely. You can complete your home purchase with your eyes open as to the condition of the property and all its equipment and systems. You will also have learned many things about your new home from the report, and will want to keep that information for future reference. 

Q. What are the most common house problems buyers can expect to find?

In homes 20 years and older, roof shingles, foundation cracks, wood destroying insect damage, electrical wiring, and surface water drainage systems are the items most commonly cited on inspection reports as needing repair or modification.

In new construction, inspections frequently report poor landscaping drainage, inadequate attic ventilation, poor roof construction, and substandard masonry and finish work. Sometimes the problems are related to poor initial design problems such as venerable areas of the roof structure, and unwise location of utility rooms (such as located on the 2nd floor or it an interior wall rather than exterior wall where there is a direct exterior vent for the dryer.)

Properties that are currently or have been rental property are generally in poor maintenance. "Investment properties" can also be very problematic. They are usually houses that have had recent improvements and were purchased at a low price to be repaired then resold at generally a much higher price. Thus these houses are often older and may have had past problems that forced it to be sold at one time at a "bargain" price. Sometimes the repairs are well done but often they reflect "handyman" workmanship which falls below building code and industrial standards. 

Q. Are there any environmental hazards present in the home?

In response to a growing awareness of the dangers posed by certain substances, such as radon gas, asbestos fiber, and urea formaldehyde foam insulation, many consumers are paying extra to have special tests performed to make sure their new home doesn�t pose a health hazard to them and their family. Although a standard home inspection does not include environmental items, many home inspectors offer environmental assessment as an optional service, or recommend further evaluation.

When Do I Request an Inspection?

The best time to consult the inspector is right after you have made an offer on your new building. The real estate contract usually allows for a grace period to inspect the building. Ask your professional agent to include this inspection clause in the contract, making your purchase obligation contingent upon the findings of a professional inspection.

Do you check for cosmetic  items?

No, all houses show some degree of normal wear. Toilets will at time overflow thus causing a small stains in the grout. The varnish on a floor will wear thin in one area faster than another due to use. Roof coverings begin to show wear on the day they are installed. Even new homes show slight paint imperfections and flooring that has some mild evidence of normal traffic. Walls often show scuff marks and paint color will often vary within a room. These things do not affect the basic functionality of the house. The criteria of wear is based on whether the item is performing as intended and possibly in need of some immediate repair. If you want a nit picky list of problems, then you can compile that list on your own separate from the inspection report. An overly scrutinized property could produce a report that is not helpful in the long term or reflective of the general functional condition of the property. Sometimes unethical buyers try to blow a small problem into a seeming larger one in order to get a lower selling price. Any emotion packed tactic / ploy usually doesn't work and only alienates the seller. Being manipulative only causes ill will.

Q. Should the real estate agent hang around during the inspection?

Absolutely not! Most know very little about the condition of the house in a technical sense. The Texas Real Estate Commission does not require agent salespeople or brokers to be educated on technical building trade issues. Therefore many have limited abilities in this area. It is best that they are not present during the inspection. The worst agents try to control the inspection by using misdirection and have often made obvious efforts to minimize property flaws, to the detriment of a potential buyer's interests. If you insist that your agent be present, you are doing a major disservice to your self and this inspector's need to provide a quality service. An agent that insists in hanging around may be one that is not worth having to protect the buyer's rudimentary and financial interests.

Q. Should the owner's be present during the inspection?

Absolutely not! Like the unethical real estate agents that might interfere in the inspection, an owner might choose to hang around to make sure something are not checked. They have been know to hide things that know are broken and some have overtly lied about repairs and potential problems. It is best they are not at the property during the inspection. Even if they aren't present, some owners have still tried to hide / cover up problems that they very well know do exist. May the buyer beware if the owner refuses to leave.

Q. Can you elaborate about repairs related to used homes? 

After the inspection the list of repair items then needs to be quantified and estimated for a dollar value and bids on repairs. Time is of the essence and getting firm bids will consume a good deal of your time. The probability of getting these numbers together will be difficult and the seller may not be motivated to allow repair people repeated access to the property. So the buyer usually feels the pinch and the estimates become "guesses" that are not well founded. Usually there is no time for actual repairs so the repair list along with the "guestimates" are turned back over the agents, who can stall until right near the end of the 10 day period. This is when the worst agent puts the pressure on to sell the house as is.  

Q. Do you give second opinion reviews? 

Yes. No one is perfect and thus things do get overlooked. If an inspector has failed to find an obvious problem or if they have rendered a questionable viewpoint, you might want to have a second opinion. It may give you a better peace of mind knowing that the property is reported as accurately as possible. Inspecting house is in that aspect is similar to doctor's inspecting bodies. You want someone who will take the time needed and perform as many tests as necessary to give you the most complete assessment possible.

Q. How long (in a time frame) is an inspection on a house valid? 

It is only valid for a relatively short duration and thus represents condition of the property during the time span of the in which the inspection took place. Usually this is sufficient to work with within a 7 to 10 day sales option window.

Q. How accurate is the State mandated seller's standard disclosure statement? 

They are of very limited value. Sometimes a flooding, foundation or termite problem may be called out. Often many other things are not revealed. Usually they are so incomplete that they become almost worthless.

Q. How valuable is a home warranty package? 

They can be of limited value if you do not read all the details. Some new home builders have many loopholes in the details. The devil can be in the details. A warranty package for used homes can also have far too many loop holes. The companies want to make a profit so they too can be less conscientious when dealing with complaints and customer support.

Please investigate and read all the details of any contract, title or warranty. These are legal documents. You might want to get your own lawyer to explain the bombastically arcane language of any contract. That old world "common law" language is in there to protect the writer of the contract and to keep lawyers working. I have a glossary file that explains many of the terms. It is available on this website.

Q. Who do you submit the report to? 

I report only to the buyer. 

Q. Why is knowing the condition of the home so important?

The condition of the home can have a huge financial impact on the home purchase decision.  Home prices have risen substantially over the years and so has the cost of home repairs.  Today's home buyer must consider not only the cost of buying the home, but also the cost of owning the home.  Nothing can be more devastating, both emotionally and financially, than to have a family move into their new home only to face thousands of dollars in unexpected repair costs.

Q: What does a home inspector do?

A professional, well-trained inspector can provide you with the information you need to make an informed purchase decision and a good investment!  A written home inspection report will detail the home's condition including the heating and cooling systems, the plumbing and electrical systems, the roof and siding, as well as the framing and foundation.  In addition, many home inspectors will provide or can arrange for additional environmental services that may be required or desired.

Q: Once I have a home inspection, then what do I do?

Armed with this valuable information, you can then factor the needed repair costs into the home purchase equation.  After the inspection, you can complete the purchase with more confidence.  In the end, a professional well-trained home inspector can provide you with peace of mind that you've made a sound and intelligent investment decision.

Q: In my area, home inspectors have to be licensed.  Will that guarantee that I will get a good inspector?

Not necessarily.  Unfortunately licensing often gives consumers a false sense of security.  Licensing does not differentiate between professional inspectors with experience and those who are less prepared and trained.  While licensing is a good first step in the screening of inspectors, you should still carefully evaluate the credentials of the inspector that you are about to hire. 

Q. What Is An Expert Witness?

An expert witness is someone who has a special knowledge, skill, or experience in the subject about which he/she is to testify. Testimony given by such a witness, in his/her capacity as such, constitutes expert evidence or expert testimony.

Q. Who Uses The Services Of A Home Inspector As An Expert Witness?

Anyone who needs help in resolving issues (problem resolution) related to either faulty or negligent work done by a contractor / tradesperson or faulty or negligent services provided by a home inspector. The hiring party may be an attorney or the homeowner.

Q. If I've Had A Problem With A Contractor What Should I Do?

Don't lose your cool.

Keep a log of phone conversations.

Keep accurate records of events.

Until advised by an attorney, never fire the contractor.

Always keep a record of payments.

Hire a professional inspector to examine work and documents.

Ask your lawyer or check the Yellow Pages or the Internet.

Questions to ask a potential Expert Witness:

  • Have you provided expert witness services in the past?
  • Have you ever testified in court?
  • Do you have any trade licenses?
  • Do you have a written contract?

Q: What Can I Expect From An Expert Witness?

Some of the services an expert witness provides depends on the type of case. In a case involving a complaint against the work of a contractor, an expert witness may help document the alleged faulty work. This could include a full inspection of the work, with a written report and pictures, Building Code research, and court testimony. Most expert witnesses charge a set fee per hour plus travel and related expenses. Hourly fees will vary depending upon the type of case, and the experience of the expert witness. You can expect an hourly fee of between $75 and $150 per hour. In most cases, I charge $100 per hour with 4 hour minimum.
 

Question to TREC. I am a real estate agent and my husband is a real estate inspector. May I recommend him to potential buyers to conduct inspections for them?

A. Under the Rules of the Texas Real Estate Commission, Section 535.156(b), you have a duty to place the interest of your principal above your own. You must deal honestly and fairly with all parties, but you represent only the principal and owe a duty of fidelity to that principal. The Canons of Professional Ethics and Conduct for Real Estate Licensees contained in the Rules of the Texas Real Estate Commission state what is expected under the law and what your obligations are under the law. The Rules may be found on our web site at www.trec.state.tx.us/formslawspubs/rules_codes/trecrules.asp. We recommend that at the very least you inform potential buyers that the inspector is your husband, and you should make it clear to them that they have the right to choose any inspector they wish to inspect the property.

You deserve to know about a potential new home in detail before the closing. A Diligent inspection provides Insight to the property. Call 281-480-3388 for an appointment.

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