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Information General Inspection   Guarantee Inspection Services   Resale Inspections Photos set 1  New Home Inspections
Select the areas below to explore special inspection services.

Some have more pages and levels linked to them. 

Standards-Practice Free Stuff Legal Specialty Inspections
associations Special Coupons Disclosure Stucco (EIFS) Dryvit Inspections Home / Building Security Review Septic System Inspection Indoor Air Quality
assoc. links cooperation Copy Rights  Electronic circuit analysis    Maintenance Inspections Foundation Analysis / Inspection Commercial Properties Inspections 
more links Negotiate Special Help End of Warranty Inspections Condominiums (largely tenancy in common) Water Well inspections Insurance Inspections
Lemon Law Truth Due Diligence Water Intrusion Swimming Pools and Hot Tub inspections  Termite inspections Fire Protection Inspections
History mini-inspection Disclosure  Building Code Compliance Energy Efficiency Expert Testimony ADA Handicap building analysis 
    Report Town-homes (partial tenancy in common) Chimneys Environment Inspections Flooding

 

 

 

Here is some small help related to doing your own inspection. Actually you are better off hiring a professional than to risk your decisions of a limited knowledge base. 

A consumer home inspection checklist does not replace the professional home inspection.

You do the consumer home inspection before making an offer to purchase a home. Once you conduct your own consumer home inspection and make a

decision to buy a particular home, you will sign a contract and

have the home you've selected professionally inspected. The professional home inspector gives you an objective and comprehensive report before closing.

In addition, you may want to have the home tested for possible environmental hazards which are not usually visible, including, lead in the water, lead in paint, asbestos, radon or other toxic materials.

Before You Conduct a Home Inspection

Schedule your home inspection during daylight hours. You may want to bring along the following tools.

Consumer Home Inspection Form (follows this introduction)

A powerful flashlight to use in basements and crawl spaces

A stepladder to look in the attic to check insulation, the underside of the roof and indirect lighting fixtures

A tape recorder to record any information too lengthy to note on the inspection form

A circuit tester to check the circuits

Helpful Hints

Plan to go through the home completely twice so you can do an overall analysis. Remember to consider the following when you conduct your home inspection so you can effectively evaluate the home:

 

The existing condition of all systems and equipment

Any unusual features that may increase or decrease the appeal of the home

Any problems or features you want your professional home inspector to check out

The quality and condition of the structure

Routine house cleaning and maintenance items: paint, furnace filters, gutters, caulking in bathrooms, landscaping, floors, appliances, walls, etc.

What to Expect

This checklist will give you the information you need to identify a home's distinguishing features that make it attractive for purchase

Estimate the costs and identify solutions for any problems uncovered during the consumer home inspection

Provide a basis for comparing homes you are considering buying

INTERVIEW THE OCCUPANTS

 

It's possible to collect a tremendous amount of useful information before you conduct the consumer home inspection by sitting down with the sellers or occupants. Ask open-ended, leading questions. You may begin by asking the occupants:

Are you aware of any termite damage or activity in your home? Virtually all homes sold today require a termite inspection and certificate so a complete history of any damage, treatment or repair is important to know from the start.

Does your home have any existing or repaired structural problems, such as cracks in the basement floor, rotted floor joists or settlement cracks in the walls?

 

Do you ever have moisture in your basement? A typical concern when buying a home is a wet basement or crawl space. It's important to learn about a wet basement early so that it can be repaired or you can negotiate the price of repair before you buy the home.

Have you seen any signs of a leaking roof? If the roof has leaked in the past, it's important to determine whether repairs were made or a new roof was installed. If the home has an asphalt/fiberglass shingle roof, which usually lasts 15 to 18 years and the home is 17 years old, ask if the roof has been replaced recently. A professional home inspector can determine this for you.

Have you experienced any problems with the heating or air conditioning systems? Find out the ages of the heating and cooling equipment and any problems the occupants may have had with the systems.

Have you tested your home for radon recently? The risks from radon gas vary greatly in different parts of the country. Contact the local environmental protection agency to obtain information about the presence of radon in the area.

Is the electrical service satisfactory? Find out the capacity of the electrical service and whether the occupants have had problems, such as fuses blowing frequently, circuits overloading, outlets not working or lights flickering when appliances are turned on.

What is the condition of the plumbing system? Find out about the water pressure, whether the plumbing leaks, whether there's enough hot water, the age of the water heater and whether the system has been updated in any way.

Have you remodeled or made improvements to your home? If improvements have been made to the home, inquire about the competence of the
individual or company who provided the service. Check the credentials of the person who made the improvements, to make sure he or she is a licensed builder, owner or technician.

Was your home built before 1978? Before 1960? Some homes built before 1978 and many homes built before 1960 contain lead-based paint. If the paint is chipping, peeling, cracking, flaking etc., and contains lead, it may be dangerous especially for children younger than 7. You may wish to inquire specifically if the home contains lead paint or if it has ever been tested for lead paint.

 

THE INSPECTION
 

Floor Plans

When inspecting a home, consider its layout and the following factors: In large homes with only one bathroom, you should consider the cost of installing a second bath on the bedroom level or a powder room on the first floor.

Look at the amount and quality of storage space. Does it fit your needs?

Check to see if the home plan provides separation between personal and shared areas. The room layouts and circulation patterns should allow for flexible furniture arrangement.

floor plan
 

 

Notice whether the parking space is convenient and provides for guest parking. Check for convenient layout. For example, the laundry room should be close to where the laundry is generated, ideally, on the second floor. Also, the refrigerator door should open toward the counter and work space of the kitchen.

Walls and Ceilings

In nearly all homes built before World War II, the walls and ceilings were made of plaster. While the exterior walls in a brick home built before 1935 are
usually built with the plaster directly on masonry, the walls are very solid,though they don't provide for air space or prevent condensation.

The interior walls and ceilings in a home built before 1935 are usually made of plaster on wood lath. Over time, wood lath loses its resilience and pulls away from the studs or joists, causing waves in the walls or ceilings. This condition is usually more pronounced in ceilings because the weight of the plaster plus walking on the floor above creates movement. In addition, wood lath is easily affected by any moisture from a roof, plumbing leak or humidity in the attic.Check to see if wallpaper over wood lath and plaster has been painted. If you try to remove the painted wallpaper, you may damage the plaster.

Check for walls and ceilings that are made of rock lath and plaster, which is common in homes built between 1935 and 1950. Typically, these are very high quality. Check the condition of drywall walls and ceilings. Pay particular attention to the condition of taped joints.

Windows

As you conduct your home inspection, be aware of the many different types of windows in the home and their condition. In some jurisdictions, fire codes
require that windows operate and that bedroom windows be large enough to escape through in case of fire.

Steel casement windows, for example, are not generally considered to be quality windows because they become sprung, readily conduct cold air into the home and will only take piggyback type storm windows. Replacement hardware is available but is becoming increasingly expensive. Steel casement windows can easily be replaced with new, double-hung vinyl replacement windows.

Wood double-hung windows are very common, especially in older homes. They're likely to be in good condition and storm windows will usually make them more energy efficient.

 

 

Aluminum sliding windows, which were often installed in the 1950s, are inexpensive but serviceable. They are now available with insulated glass, but storm windows are usually less expensive.

Jalousie windows do not provide adequate insulation and leak air at a tremendous rate.

Open the windows to ensure that they are not painted shut.

Check the casement window to see if the hardware is working properly and whether double-hung windows have broken sash cords.

Doors

Exterior doors should be the solid or panel type and should have good weather-stripping and thresholds.

Check interior and exterior doors to see if they are level, easy to open and close, and have hardware ingood condition.

Check aluminum and wood sliding doors to see if they have single pane or insulated glass; the latter is much more energy efficient.Check bi-fold closet doors throughout the home. They may be steel, wood or masonite. Wood is the best quality.

Closets

 

Note the number of closets, their condition and depth.

Fireplaces and Wood-Burning Stoves

Fireplaces are a popular selling feature, but you should carefully examine them during your home inspection.

Look up the chimney to see whether the flue is lined with terra cotta. Ordinary brick lining is in violation of most codes. It is usually unsafe. Though rare, a chimney of ordinary brick to a thickness of 12 inches on each side is acceptable. The cost of relining a chimney with terra cotta is about $2,000.Check to see if there is a working damper in the fireplace. If there's not, home heat will escape up the chimney unless the opening is closed and the fireplace is not used. Newer fireplaces may have cap dampers, which are reported to be more energy efficient. Ask the owners to have the chimneys cleanedbefore you buy the home. Chimneys should be cleaned annually.

Check to see if the metal flues of wood-burning stoves or fireplaces are clean.

Floors

If the floors are carpeted, check to see if the carpeting covers hardwood or plywood floors. In newer homes, plywood is typically used. Hardwood floors are better and usually considered to be a distinguishing feature.

Check the condition of the floors or carpet. Ask the seller to replace the carpet or other floor covering or to refinish wood floors if necessary.

Check for moisture damage to parquet floors. In older homes, the parquet is made of strips of wood glued into 9-inch square blocks. This flooring is extremely sensitive to moisture and can swell and buckle when exposed to dampness. A newer type of parquet flooring is made of 1/2-inch or 3/4-inch plywood with a hardwood and laminated finish. This flooring is much less sensitive to moisture and can be safely installed even below grade at the basement level.

 

Determine if the house has asbestos floor tiles. The asbestos in the tiles is "cementitious," meaning the asbestos fibers are bound in place within the tiles and probably cannot become airborne, potentially breathable and therefore a health hazard. If you choose to have asbestos-containing tiles removed, be sure the work is done by qualified, certified professionals.

Insulation

As fuel costs continue to rise, insulation is an increasingly important consideration in a home. It's usually difficult to tell whether insulation exists within the walls of a home. As a rule, if the home has little or no attic insulation, there is probably none in the walls. If the attic is well insulated, the walls probably will be too, depending on the age of the home.

The R-factor is the unit of measurement of insulating value in a home. It refers to how well a material resists conductive heat flow.

The higher the R-factor, the greater the insulating value. The recommended R-factors are R-11 to R15, for walls R-19 to R-30, for ceilings.

Ventilation

Use the following rule of thumb when inspecting a home's ventilation: Adequate ventilation in an attic is one square foot of ventilation for each 150 square feet of floor space. In most homes, you can reach the attic through a ceiling access panel if there is no stairway. Suburban homes built after World War II usually have an attic access in the center hall at top of the stairs or in one of the closets. Older urban row homes have an attic access that may also serve as access to the roof. You will normally find it in the bathroom, hall, closet or on a rear porch.

THE FINAL ANALYSIS

Once you've completed your consumer home inspection, analyze your findings to identify the positive and negative features of the home. Then decide how to fit them into your analysis. Pay special attention to the quality of the home's construction, the level of maintenance, the quality of individual parts, replacement cycles and any remodeling or other improvements that have been made.

Consider whether a home is especially well-built and decide which factors are most important to you. If a home has been well-maintained, it can command a price much higher than the same home with fair to poor maintenance. On the other hand, homes with poor maintenance can be bought at favorable prices.

The quality of individual parts of a home is also important and may not be what you expect. For example, a big, old home with modest construction features might have a high quality remodeled kitchen or a home with original casement windows may have upgraded to new, insulated glass replacement windows.

A sound home will last indefinitely, but its integral parts will need replacing on fairly regular cycles. You should know the replacement cycles for these parts and be able to recognize where they are in their estimated life cycle. Hot water heaters, for example, normally last about 8 to 12 years. If you're looking at a 10-year-old home with the original hot water heater, the unit probably will need to be replaced soon.

It's important for you to be aware of any remodeling or improvements because the value they add to a home can be significant. In your final analysis, be sure to consider to take note of any additions, an enclosed porch, a finished basement, added bathrooms or a remodeled kitchen.

Costs of Remodeling, Renovation and Repair

As a prospective homebuyer, it's difficult to be an expert in construction and maintenance costs but a working knowledge of these areas can be valuable. You will most likely need information in the following areas:

Attention to detail
 
 

Cost of planned remodeling and renovation

Maintenance costs

Value of remodeling and renovation work already done

Cost comparisons of various materials

Value of Work Already Completed

 

When you inspect a home, your ability to detect and price previous remodeling can be valuable. If a home in a standard subdivision has been substantially remodeled, you should determine the approximate cost of the work and, the increased value of the property compared to other homes in the subdivision.

For example, suppose a home had a 300-square-foot addition built within the past five years. If you take the rule-of-thumb cost for additions of $100 per square foot, that addition may translate into a $30,000 improvement to the property. If the home is priced at $15,000 more than similar homes in the subdivision, you would be getting as much as $15,000 additional value by buying the home with the addition.

Consult with a real estate professional to determine whether the home has been over-improved for its neighborhood. If so, it may affect resale of the home.

Cost Comparison of Materials

When you compare one home to another, it's easier to tell the relative value if you know the cost of materials. Keep in mind the following relationships when comparing material costs.

A slate roof costs about five to six times as much as an asphalt shingle roof.

The cost of masonry or brick facing is about three times as much as the cost of wood, vinyl or aluminum.

The cost of hardwood flooring is about twice that of carpeting laid over plywood.

An insulated glass window costs about twice as much as a window with single glass.

The cost per square foot for plaster walls is about two or three times as much as the cost of drywall.

Estimating Maintenance Costs

If a home has been neglected, it's helpful to know the maintenance costs, such as repainting, installing gutters and downspouts, sanding and finishing floors, window repair and minor carpentry. If you can estimate how much it will cost to restore the home to prime condition, you can better judge whether the home is priced properly. As the homeowner, you will be paying for maintenance.

Check the exterior of house first. Look at the front yard, the landscape and trees. Check windows and doors. Replacing widows is expensive, so make sure they are in good condition. Another important area that needs to be looked at is the roof. Examine the shingles. How many layers are there? What is the flexibility of the shingles? Are there patches on the roof? Also check the outer walls, looking at window connections and for dry rot. On the exterior there may also be an electrical box with circuit breakers. If you have any doubt about the electrical system and it's ability to handle your needs, hire an electrician. Finally don't forget the foundation. Check the sill plate area for any cracks.

You deserve to know about a potential new home in detail before the closing. A       Diligent inspection provides Insight to the property. Call 281-480-3388       for an appointment.

Moving inside the house some of your main concerns are major cracking in walls or ceilings, water damage, insufficient electrical outlets, no wall insulation. Starting in the basement check for moisture, the wiring system, the insulated vent and ducts. Turn on the heat and air conditioning. Ask the owner and about the climate control costs. Next check the house's interior walls. Is there fuzz, water damage, discoloration, bulges or bubbles? It doesn't hurt to feel the wall either.

You deserve to know about a potential new home in detail before the closing. A       Diligent inspection provides Insight to the property. Call 281-480-3388       for an appointment.

Moving on to kitchen, some areas of concern dust, dirt, undrinkable water, insects, rodents, appliance problems, floor problems, and future remodeling considerations. When in the kitchen check the pump and tank. Open cupboard doors to see any signs of roaches or rats. How many appliances are there and are there enough hookups for your appliances. When walking on the floor does it shake? How is the pitch? Is the floor level? These are all questions you need to answer before moving on.

Another important area is the plumbing system. Some of the concerns involved are insufficient water pressure, drainage, corroded pipes, water damage, and further remodeling consideration. See how the water runs. Turn on the shower flush the toilet. Hire a plumber to look things over if you are still concerned.

You deserve to know about a potential new home in detail before the closing. A       Diligent inspection provides Insight to the property. Call 281-480-3388       for an appointment.

Move up to the attic. Look around but be careful. Walk only on the joists. Look for ventilation, water damage and structure. Check for the amount of insulation, leaks, and weak floor joists.

NEW CONSTRUCTION RESIDENTIAL CHECK LIST (Very Short Version) All the numbers have been changed to characters.

 

PLAN AND PERMIT REVIEW

Is a permit card prominently displayed?

Does the building permit and permit card have the correct address, permit number, owner and builder?

Does the proposed building location meet the required front, side and rear zoning set backs?

Do the plans indicate a minimum of one habitable room having a floor area of !%) square feet?

Do all habitable rooms have a minimum area of &) square feet?

Do the plans indicate a minimum horizontal dimension of seven (&) feet for habitable rooms?

Is a kitchen indicated on the plans?

Do the floor dimensions for the kitchen indicate a minimum floor area of %) square feet?

Do the plans indicate a water closet, lavatory, and a bathtub or shower?

Is the water closet and bathtub or shower installed in a room which affords occupancy privacy?

Verify that no openings are indicated on the plans between the garage and rooms used for sleeping purposes?

Are the doors leading from the garage into the living area a minimum of !-#/*" thick?

Do the plans indicate a minimum of one exit?

Are the minimum required exit door dimensions #' )" wide and ^' *" high?

Review all the details indicated in the plans?

Have a copy of the design criteria for your jurisdiction area?

 

FOUNDATIONS

Verify the minimum compressive strength of concrete at @* days to be @%)) PSI?

Do all foundation walls extend at least ^ inches above the finished grade?

Do the foundations meet the minimum requirements?

Do basement walls satisfy the requirements?

 

CONCRETE SLABS

Has the area within the foundation walls been cleared of vegetation and foreign material where a concrete slab is to be poured?

Have the sub‑base and base fill courses been properly prepared?

Is the vapor barrier properly installed?

Have adequate contraction joints been included in the concrete slab?

 

WATERPROOFING

Have adequate foundation drains been provided? Are they placed on @ inches of crushed rock and covered with a minimum of ^ inches of rock?

Have exterior walls of basements been adequately damp proofed?

 

FOUNDATION STUDS AND COLUMNS

Is the minimum length of foundation studs !$ inches and are they at least equal in size and spacing to the studs in the exterior walls?

Are column bases of natural decay resistance, treated wood, or are provisions made to protect them from rot or decay?

Are columns adequately anchored to prevent lateral displacement?

Are all wood members subject to termite and decay pressure treated or of a termite or decay‑resistant heartwood?

Is adequate, ventilation provided under floor space?

Is the grade under the floor clean of all vegetation and organic material?

 

WOOD FRAMED - GENERAL

Do all load‑bearing lumber, plywood, and particleboard have proper grade marks?

Are all joints, beams and rafters Number # or Standard Grade lumber or equivalent?

 

WOOD FRAMED - WALLS

Are all headers and studs Number @, Standard or Stud Grade lumber or equivalent?

Are all bearing studs @" x $" spaced !^" O. C. in one and two story buildings?

When the sole plate is cut for plumbing or heating is a metal tie of not less than !* gauge in thickness and !-!/@" wide fastened by not less than four !^d nails to each side of the opening?

Do the size of all headers conform to Table R-!@?

Has adequate fire stopping been provided in the required spaces?

Does the plywood sheathing thickness and panel identification index conform to the stud spacing and nailing requirements of Table BR-!! (?

Is the minimum ceiling height over the minimum required room area in any habitable room %') " ?

Is the average ceiling height in %)% of the required area &'-^" or more?

 

WOOD FRAMED - FLOORS

Does the floor construction conform to Figure (‑$ and is it nailed in accordance with Table BR‑##?

Do the unsupported spans of floor joists conform to either Table NFPA J! or J!@?

Do the unsupported girder spans conform to Table R-!# or R-!$?

Do the allowable spans and grades for plywood sheathing conform to Tables BR-@& or BR-@(?

Does the joist spacing and plank sheathing thickness conform to Table BR-@*?

Is the minimum thickness of particleboard sheathing ! /$" and is the type !-B-! ?

Do the ends of each joist bear on !-!/@" of wood or metal or #" of masonry?

Are joists supported laterally at the ends by solid blocking or diagonal bridging?

Are notches in the ends of joists !/$ the depth of the joists or less?

Are edges of holes bored in joists @" from the top or bottom of the joists?

Is the maximum diameter of any hole in the joist !/# the joist depth or less?

Are notches in the top or bottom just ! /^ the joist depth or less, and are they located in the end !/# of the joist spans?

WOOD FRAMED - ROOFS

Is the minimum roof pitch # in !@?

Do the unsupported spans of rafters and ceiling joists conform to NFPA Tables?

Are the rafters framed directly opposite each other at the ridge?

Do the allowable span and grades for plywood sheathing conform to Table BR‑@&?

Is the maximum span for board type roof sheathing @$" and is the board %/*" net thickness or more for solid sheathing and #/$" net thickness for spaced sheathing?

Is adequate ventilation provided in attics and rafter spaces?

 

STAIRWAYS

Are stairway tread, riser, and headroom dimensions ok?

Is the minimum clear width of stairways at least #')"?

Do handrails project a maximum of #-!/@" into the required width?

 

LANDINGS

Is a #')" x #')" landing provided on each side of exit doors?

When a door swings over the landing is the landing a maximum of &-!/@" below the threshold level?

When a door does not swing over the landing is the landing a maximum of !-!!@" below the threshold level?

 

MASONRY

Is the top course of all corbels a header course and is the wall the corbels are built into a minimum of !@" thick?

Are all structural pier widths less than three times their thickness?

In stack bond is longitudinal reinforcement consisting of two continuous wires each with a cross sectional area of ).)!& square inches provided !^" o.c.?

Does the unsupported height of masonry walls conform to Table R-$&?

Are lintels properly designed?

Are masonry walls anchored to floor and roof systems in accordance with Figure (-% or (-^?

In reinforced masonry walls is the diameter of vertical reinforcement a minimum of #/*" and spaced a maximum of $'-)" o.c.?

Are all reinforcement bars completely embedded in mortar or grout?

Does all reinforcement have a minimum mortar coverage of one bar diameter?

Do all beams have a minimum #" thick width and #" long bearing support?

In hollow masonry construction, is the masonry construction properly bonded throughout the total masonry wall, stretcher course at vertical intervals no greater than #$" cavity walls metal ties for a maximum of $-!/@ square feet of wall surface?

In solid masonry are &%% of the units in any vertical plane perpendicular to the wall plane or are the units lapped at the ends of the units above and below a distance not less than ! -!/@" or one half the height of the units?

In solid masonry construction do solid headers extend a minimum of $" into the backing at a maximum of @$" vertically and horizontally?

In cavity wall masonry construction, is the backing a minimum of $" wide and is the cavity width ! to $ inches wide?

Are the metal ties a minimum of #/!^ inch diameter or equivalent in strength and stiffness and embedded in horizontal joints?

Is one metal tie provided for a maximum of $-!/@ square feet of wall area for #-!/@" net cavity widths and # square feet for widths in excess of #-! /@"?

Is type M or S mortar used for grouted masonry construction?

If work is stopped for one hour or longer in grouted masonry construction, is the grout stopped ! /@" below the top of the unit?

Are provisions made for cleaning grout space in grouted masonry construction?

In grouted masonry construction is grouting done in a continuous pour for lifts not exceeding $ feet?

In reinforced grouted masonry is the minimum thickness of the mortar between masonry units and reinforcement !/$ inch?

Is there a continuous unobstructed vertical cell measuring not less than @ inches by # inches for vertical cells to be filled in reinforced hollow unit masonry?

In reinforced hollow unit masonry are cleanout openings provided at the bottom of all cells to be filled at each pour of grout, where such grout pour is in excess of $ feet in height?

Is vertical reinforcement held in position at top and bottom at intervals not exceeding !(@ diameters of the re-enforcement in reinforced hollow masonry construction?

Are all cells containing reinforcement filled solidly with grout in reinforced hollow masonry construction?

Do all lath attachments for exterior lath conform to Tables R-^@ and R-^#?

Do the thickness and proportions of aggregate and cementitious material conform to Table R‑^$ and R‑^^ for exterior plaster applications?

Is masonry veneer installed in accordance with Figure (-!)?

Is masonry veneer attached to wood at points more than @% feet above adjacent ground for Seismic Zones No. @ and #, or #% feet in Seismic Zones No. ) and ! ?

Are all lintels supporting masonry veneer noncombustible and do the length of spans and size conform to Table -^*?

Is weather resistant siding attached in accordance with Table R-^(?

Is a weather resistant membrane consisting of asphalt saturated felt free from holes and breaks and weighing not less than !$ pounds per !)) square feet or equivalent applied over studs or sheathing in those areas identified by Table R-^(?

Is the felt or membrane lapped not less than two inches at horizontal joints and ^ inches at vertical joints?

Is corrosion resistive flashing installed at top and sides of all exterior window and door openings?

Is corrosion resistive flashing installed at intersections of chimneys, or other masonry construction with frame or stucco walls with projecting lips on both sides under stucco copings; under and at ends of masonry, wood or metal copings and sills; continuously above all projecting wood trim, at wall and roof intersections; under built-in gutters; in all roof valleys and around all roof openings?

Do all exterior plywood joints occur over a framing member or are the joints lapped !-!/@ inches?

Are wall coverings securely fastened in accordance with Table R-^(?

Are shingles attached with Standard Shingle nails?

 

LIGHT AND VENTILATION

Do all habitable rooms have glazed areas of not less than * percent of the floor area of the room?

Do all bathrooms, water‑closet compartments and other similar rooms have glazed areas of not less than # square feet of which !!@ of the area must be open-able?

Does the glazing in exterior doors, glazed panels immediately adjacent to doors, sliding glass doors, storm doors and similar openings conform to CPSC ! ^-CFR, Part !@)!?

 

INTERIOR COVERINGS

Are all vertical supports for gypsum wall board and lath a minimum of @ inches nominal in the least dimension?

Does the thickness, spacing of supports and method of attachment of gypsum lath conform to Tables R‑^@ and R‑^#?

Do the thickness and proportions of aggregate and plaster conform to R-^$ and R-^%?

Does the support spacing and wallboard size and fasteners conform to Table R-^! ?

Is a minimum attic access of @@" x #)" provided to an attic area having a clear height of over #)inches?

Are handrails having a minimum height of #) inches and a maximum height of #$ inches measured vertically from the nosing of the treads provided on at least one side of stairways with # or more risers?

 

ROOF COVERING

Are roof coverings type A, B, or C?

If roof coverings are not A, B or C is there a minimum separation of !) feet between buildings?

Are base sheets applied only to solid surface roofs and are the base sheets properly cemented or nailed to the roof decking?

This tiny tiny tiny mini-guide and preview is just a very small sample of what to expect. I will not expect you to know the building codes or much of anything else about the technical side of properties. That is why you are paying me, to get the knowledge associated with my experience. I hope this list of things to look for will aid you in your home buying experience. And remember it's not just a purchase, but a life long investment.

Diligent Inspections represents the interests of families purchasing homes. You need to have your property inspected before closing to safeguard your interests. The inspection report and review give you a change to have your "eyes open" in relation to the property conditions. Call (281) 480-3388 now to set up an appointment.

You deserve to know about a potential new home in detail before the closing. A       Diligent inspection provides Insight to the property. Call 281-480-3388       for an appointment.

WWW.Do-Dligent.Com Home Page

General Information Company Info Store Resale Properties New Construction
Items Covered Services Offered Contact Us Client Comments Products profiles month 1 foundation
The Process Why Inspect? Company Profile Spotlight features Operate Dome  2  3 4 Framing
Selection Process Question & Answers Compare for Yourself Independence Support CD Castle photo collection  6 build out
In Your Interests

Insurance Inspections

Qualifications Site Map New DVD & checklists 1  2  3 9 final
Discounts  more? Thanks to You Mission Vision Sponsorship 4 5 6 7 Foundation extra
Information General Inspection   Guarantee Inspection Services   Resale Inspections Photos set 1  New Home Inspections
Select the areas below to explore special inspection services.

Some have more pages and levels linked to them. 

Standards-Practice Free Stuff Legal Specialty Inspections
associations Special Coupons Disclosure Stucco (EIFS) Dryvit Inspections Home / Building Security Review Septic System Inspection Indoor Air Quality
assoc. links cooperation Copy Rights  Electronic circuit analysis    Maintenance Inspections Foundation Analysis / Inspection Commercial Properties Inspections 
more links Negotiate Special Help End of Warranty Inspections Condominiums (largely tenancy in common) Water Well inspections Insurance Inspections
Lemon Law Truth Due Diligence Water Intrusion Swimming Pools and Hot Tub inspections  Termite inspections Fire Protection Inspections
History mini-inspection Disclosure  Building Code Compliance Energy Efficiency Expert Testimony ADA Handicap building analysis 
    Report Town-homes (partial tenancy in common) Chimneys Environment Inspections Flooding